Archive for March, 2011

Audio: Discussing Demotix

29th March, 2011

The March Branch Meeting “Discussing Demotix” looked at the rise of the Demotix Photo Agency and its impact on the industry. The speakers were LPB Vice Chair andrew Wiard, Demotix CEO Turi Munthe and NUJ Organiser Jenny Lennox.

LPB Statement To March 26 TUC Stewards

25th March, 2011

This statement has been sent to the chief steward for Saturday’s demonstration on our behalf and is going to be read out at the stewards meeting.

 

Due to the high profile nature of this Saturday’s demonstration, media workers from a wide variety of outlets and organisations will be out in large numbers.

We are keen to avoid any kind of confrontation between stewards and photographers. This has occasionally been reported in the past.

We are aware senior stewards are working with the police to intervene in situations of disorder, however stewards have no legal power to push, move or obstruct journalists recording the event.

Media workers are not part of the march, they are reporting impartially on events and should not be corralled or directed as part of the demonstration. The UK Press Card indicates a bone fide newsgatherer and should enable journalists to pass through lines of police and stewards.

If a steward feels a photographer or media worker is getting in the way or somebody objects to them recording the steward can relay this information or request, but they have no legal power or moral authority to physically move or block any recording.

Whilst we understand stewards want to ensure the safety of the marchers, their actions cannot be at the expense of the right to report freely.

As trade union members we wish the march every success and our members look forward to documenting the event with professionalism and cooperation on all sides.

 

London Photographers’ Branch Committee

 

Met Dedicated Phone for Media Workers

25th March, 2011

The Metropolitan Police Press Bureau have set up a dedicated line for media workers covering the March for the Alternative demonstration on Saturday 26 March.

Any photographer or other lens-based media encountering difficulties with the police can call 07917 556824.

March Branch Newsletter

22nd March, 2011

March Branch Meeting: Discussing Demotix

22nd March, 2011

In the March Branch meeting, 6pm at Headland House on Tuesday 29 March, we will be holding a discussion on Demotix, the PA distribution deal and what  it means for the profession.

Solidarity with Egyptian Photographers

On a follow-up trip to Cairo, myself and Branch Secretary Jason Parkinson had a very emotional meeting with Mrs Anas, the wife of press photographer Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud who was killed by a police sniper during the Egyptian Revolution.

Derby Format 2011: Right Here, Right Now

Talks by Richard Kalvar, Chris Steele-Perkins and Grant Smith

Brutalized, then Betrayed

By Joan Connell – Republished by kind permission of Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma

The sexual assault endured by CBS correspondent Lara Logan in the chaos of Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Feb. 11‚ reported in a brief statement by her employer, brings to the forefront what has been a largely private conversation among female war correspondents about the distinct hazards they face.

 

You will need to log in to view the following links to minutes.

Draft February Branch Minutes

Draft March Committee Minutes

Suggested Positions for LPB DM Votes

March Branch Meeting: Discussing Demotix

22nd March, 2011

In the March Branch meeting, 6pm at Headland House on Tuesday 29 March, we will be holding a discussion on Demotix, the PA distribution deal and what  it means for the profession.

CEO Turi Munthe will be attending the meeting to give an insight into the Demotix business model and will be taking questions. NUJ organiser Jenny Lennox, who represented PA staff photographers during the recent redundancies, will also be speaking at the meeting along with LPB Vice Chair and freelance photographer Andrew Wiard.

The meeting will open with a slide show from the 1986 Wapping dispute. Twenty-five years ago Rupert Murdoch moved his newspaper group overnight l,eading to the sacking of over 5,500 workers. If you covered Wapping and would like to add them to the slideshow please email them over to Larry Herman by the end of the week.

Business side of the meeting will discuss a few key motions for the NUJ Delegate Meeting.

All branch motions should be sent to joint secretary JasonParkinson before the meeting commences.

Solidarity with Egyptian Photographers

21st March, 2011

LPB Branch Secretary Jason Parkinson presents money raised from UK photographers to the family (centre) of Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, a photographer who was killed by a police sniper during the Egyptian Revolution. Abeer Saady (right) is from the Egyptian Journalists Syndicate.

Article by Jess Hurd/jesshurd.co.uk

 

On a follow-up trip to Cairo, myself and Branch Secretary Jason Parkinson had a very emotional meeting with Mrs Anas, the wife of press photographer Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud who was killed by a police sniper during the Egyptian Revolution.

Ahmed’s last photograph was an image of his killer taken just before he was shot in the face. His wife hopes that this evidence will bring his murderer to justice, with the support of his trade union, the Egyptian Journalists Syndicate.

We delivered the money raised at the Battle for Cairo cinema event that the branch organised jointly with the BPPA, which featured the work of UK photographers and video journalists who covered the first 18 days of the Egyptian Revolution.

Mrs Anas and her daughter were very touched by the donation from her British colleagues and will use it to set up a photography award in Ahmed’s memory which will run every year on 25th January.

Derby Format 2011: Right Here, Right Now

9th March, 2011

Talks by Richard Kalvar, Chris Steele-Perkins and Grant Smith

 

Richard Kalvar, a Magnum photographer talked about his formative years in New York City under the tutelage of a fashion photographer. Realising he wasn’t going to enjoy working as a fashion photographer, he took to the streets of New York and ‘found’ images. As a street photographer, he maintains that it is about observing. Photographs are not made, but found. ‘You have to feel curious and make connections with human beings.’ Kalvar argues that unless photography is difficult, there is no credibility in it. As he doesn’t crop his images, he has to get it right in the camera. Using a Leica with a 35mm lens, a camera, ‘…because it’s perfect and you don’t have to about the equipment, it allows you to concentrate on picture taking’, he went in close and captured images that juxtapose people, expressions, attitudes and street paraphernalia. He composed images with a prescient anticipation of circumstance.

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Brutalized, then Betrayed

4th March, 2011

By Joan Connell – Republished by kind permission of Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma

The sexual assault endured by CBS correspondent Lara Logan in the chaos of Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Feb. 11‚ reported in a brief statement by her employer, brings to the forefront what has been a largely private conversation among female war correspondents about the distinct hazards they face.

The subsequent coverage of Logan’s ordeal also raises two key concerns for news organizations: How does any high-profile story of sexual assault get told? What are the responsibilities of news organizations when a journalist who has been sexually assaulted in the line of duty returns home?

“Women have risen to the top of war and foreign reportage,” writes Judith Matloff, a former correspondent for Reuters and the Christian Science Monitor, now a professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. “They run bureaus in dodgy places and do jobs that are just as dangerous as those that men do. But there is one area where they differ from the boys‚ sexual harassment and rape.”

“Female reporters are targets in lawless places where guns are common and punishment rare,” says Matloff, who has written extensively on the challenges faced by women reporters, including the first major article on sexual harassment and assault among female war correspondents.

Evidence suggests that the need to be perceived as a full player in the highly competitive and mostly male world of conflict reporting has led many victims of sexual assault to keep silent. In fact, a 2005 study of female war reporters by the International News Safety Institute revealed that 82 percent of respondents reported physical attack or intimidation while covering conflict and more than 55 percent reported sexual harassment or abuse.

A series of dismissive Tweets about Logan by foreign correspondent and author Nir Rosen‚ which led to Rosen’s resignation from a New York University fellowship‚ suggests why the broader issue of sexual assault on assignment has been so difficult to discuss.

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